Survey Shows That 8 Out of 10 Foreclosures Can Be Avoided

In an unofficial survey of mortgage industry professionals we concluded that the vast majority of foreclosures are simply unnecessary. The consensus of professionals surveyed was two fold. The single biggest cause of foreclosure stems from a breakdown in communication between lender and borrower. The primary reason for the breakdown in communication is a resentment of the mortgage company by the borrower. In other words the borrower feels that there is no reasoning with the mortgage company and therefore no point in trying to work things out with them.  Once frustrated, many homeowners simply give up and wait for the inevitable.

 

What the homeowner often fails to realize is that there are a plethora of tools available to allow a struggling borrower to keep their home. By now most Americans have heard of the Forbearance/Loan Modification solutions available. As popular as these plans are, they are not the only option. In addition there is the ever so unpopular chapter 13 bankruptcy. While that option is both effective and readily available it is highly undesirable.

 

In resent years as a result of this foreclosure crisis several new home retention strategies have gained popularity. Chief among these are 2 legal maneuvers once only known to mortgage bankers and real estate attorneys. He first one has been nicknamed “Produce the Note”. It relies on the fact that most servicers of mortgage loans have no way of locating the actual signed mortgage note. The homeowner is challenging the validity of the mortgage company’s right to repossess the property.  It is widely accepted that this is a stall tactic at best. However, it does give the homeowner plenty of additional time to come up with a permanent solution to the problem. It also gives the borrower leverage that can be used to force the lender into negotiations. The end result is usually some sort of Loan Modification that gives the homeowner a fresh start in exchange for the signing of new documents.

The 2nd most popular strategy is the RESPA audit. RESPA stands for Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. RESPA is a set of federally mandated guidelines that must be followed in connection with the sale and financing of real property. The gist of this strategy is to request and rummage through all the disclosures the borrower was required to sign. In all of that paperwork there is usually an error or omission. The borrower can then question the legality of the loan itself. This represents a juicy proposition for the home owner. In cases where an egregious error or omission exists, it may be possible for the borrower to sue the mortgage company for the balance of the loan. If successful, the homeowner simply walks away with the property free and clear.

There are a few other legal options available to the homeowner. These are more tricky maneuvers used by asset protection experts. Attorneys skilled at this level are usually too expensive for the average homeowner.

Thanks to the current economic climate banks are having trouble unloading the enormous inventory of houses that they already have.  Now local governments are now pressuring banks to maintain foreclosed properties. Given all these factors, the odds are clearly in the homeowner’s favor. The only reason that a borrower should consider walking away is a permanent lack of income. Barring that, there is almost always a way for the borrower to keep their home.

For more information or a free consultation with a foreclosure prevention expert visit http://www.WeHateForeclosure.com

What You Can Learn When Taking a Real Estate Investing Program

Have you heard of a real estate investing program before? If you are looking into becoming a real estate investor, you may have come across real estate investing programs available both locally and online. Although real estate investing programs are a great resource for all hopeful investors, you may be wondering whether or not it would really be worth your time and money to take a course. To find the answer to your question, you are advised to examine the materials that most real estate investing programs cover.

Before examining what you may learn when taking a real estate investing program, it is important that you remember variance. Not all real estate investing programs are the same. Programs are designed for different levels investors and they are offered for different lengths of time. These factors may determine exactly what is taught in a real estate investing course. However, with that in mind, there are many common points that are covered in most real estate investing programs.

Many real estate investing programs introduce their students to real estate investing by providing background information on exactly what it is. Although you may already have a good idea what real estate investing is and what it is all about, this information may still prove useful to you. Unfortunately, many real estate investors get so wrapped up in making money that they often forget what real estate investing is all about. If you are relatively unfamiliar with real estate inventing, a real estate investing program can help to provide you with the information you need. If you are already familiar with real estate investing, the information learned can be used to help refresh your memory.

It is also common for a real estate investing program to cover investing in general, as well as apply it to real estate. Information on what properties you should target as a real estate investor, like properties that are in foreclosure or properties that are considered fixer uppers, may also be outlined. Detailed information on each of these properties, like what they are, as well as what to look for with them may be outlined as well.

Since a big part of real estate investing is being able to do something with the properties that you purchase, a real estate investing class should also cover this. For instance, many real estate investors fix up the properties they purchased and either try to resell them for a profit or become a landlord by renting out the property to tenants. A real estate investing program should give you information on each method, as well as tips on how to make each method work.

Perhaps, the most important thing that you could learn by taking a real estate investing course is what you shouldn’t do. This information is important as it may prevent you from making many costly mistakes. Although many real estate investing programs are targeted towards beginners, there are some courses that are designed for more advanced or experienced investors. No matter what level you are currently at, you are advised to give a real estate investing program a serious look, as it may be worth your time and money, in more ways than one.

Foreclosure Hunting For Cell Tower Leases

Real estate investors who buy foreclosures are finding more and more apartment buildings with existing cellular antenna leases. Cell tower leases can be the foreclosure buyer’s best friend. However, buying foreclosed properties with a cell site lease is not easy, but the deals are out there. Even the savvy real estate investor who buys a lot of foreclosures is probably not going to be a telecom leasing expert, and frankly even the real estate investing experts don’t know squat about how to deal with a cell tower lease when you buy a foreclosed building.

A cellular antenna lease will either be attached to cell tower on raw land or rooftop cellular antenna installation on commercial or residential property. If the property is a foreclosure and the bank is not yet the receiver, it’s going to be difficult getting the information unless the Owner/Landlord is cooperative and trusts you enough to let you look at the lease. There really isn’t a way to identify these types of foreclosure properties. These types of deals are very difficult to find, and we recommend that you don’t waste your time chasing these rainbows. Focus on the low hanging fruit: bank owned residential apartment buildings and commercial properties.

It’s much easier looking for REO’s with existing cellular tenants. If the property is bank owned, as the receiver they need to disclose every existing lease encumbering the Premises prior to sale, and it’s in their best interest to provide the details of the lease or if your are lucky… multiple carrier leases.

You need to figure out the value of the lease. You want to know the commencement date of the lease, which is the date that they started paying the Owner after cell site approval. You want to know the amount of rent they are paying monthly, and what the annual increases are that the previous owner agreed to, and how many years are remaining on the back end of the lease. The particular cellular carrier will also determine the value of cell tower lease on Wall Street.

How can real estate investors find foreclosure properties that have cellular carriers as a tenant?

This is where you need to be creative. Good foreclosure investors have their bird dogs who send them deals. Chances are that they never thought about looking for foreclosures with cellular antenna site leases. Your best bet is to network with your bank’s foreclosure specialist or REO Manager.

All major banks have buildings on their books with cellular site leases which they aren’t marketing to investors. They are simply too busy to pull together a database of foreclosed properties with existing wireless carrier tenants.

Successful real estate investors who want to find these deals should tap into their existing relationships at the banks that do business in the territory that they operate in to identify potential deals that have existing cellular leases and where the bank is acting as the receiver. Ask your banker to scan their foreclosure property / REO database for terms such as Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, Omnipoint, Cellco, Sprint, Nextel, Alltel, Cingular, AT&T, Metro PCS, Crown, Towerco, SBA, or American Tower. If you find a foreclosed property or building with a cell tower lease attached, you can significantly sweeten the deal for yourself because you can pull cash out of the cellular lease – often times six figure amounts – and put it towards the mortgage or towards buying another building.

It’s also a very good idea to have a cell tower leasing expert review the terms of your lease, which disqualifies 99% of real estate attorneys.

Creative Foreclosure Avoidance Solution: Mortgage Assumption

You’re in a situation where you’re already three months late on your mortgage. Fortunately, no foreclosure lawsuits have taken place and you still have options. Your wife is starting to wonder why you’re always worried. She hasn’t received the memo. The dream house that you and your family purchased several years ago is turning out to be more than you can handle, especially with all of the unexpected bills popping up left and right. If you don’t do something soon, you’ll find yourself and your family in a very bad situation.

Looking at your situation, you can see that your property is in good shape less normal wear and tear. You can’t sell without having to come to closing with at least $35,000.00 which you don’t have right now. The reason for this is a house down the block in better condition sold last month for $150,000.00. You owe $185,000.00 and no one is willing to pay that much for your property. You don’t like the idea of doing a Short Sale as you’ve heard of the many horror stories that people go through during and after the process. Your credit does not get affected as much as it would after a foreclosure but it still takes a hit. In addition, there is still about a 35% chance that the bank may still come after you for the difference and that won’t be any fun. To top it all off the success rates of Short Sales are about fifty percent among the industry.

Listing with a Realtor and waiting for a buyer is pointless as you can’t come to closing with the difference and doing a Short Sale is definitely out of the question. Here is something that you might not have thought of: Mortgage Assumption. Some people call it different things such as Subject To the existing mortgage or Mortgage Management.

Mortgage Assumption involves transferring the deed of your property to another buyer in exchange for their bringing the mortgage current and maintaining payments. In the Real Estate market of 2013 – 2018, it’s very hard to get approved for a mortgage among American locals. This method of doing business opens the doors to thousands of buyers who, due to various circumstances, can’t qualify for a mortgage.

Your best bet in this situation is to work with a seasoned professional Real Estate buyer who can either assume the mortgage himself or find several interested parties to do so. There are not many professionals who know how to legally structure this correctly and finding an agent who knows how to do this is like finding a needle in a haystack. Find a well connected Real Estate investor who can assist you and allow you to move on with your life and preserve and maintain your good credit standing.

Short Sales – Influencing The Brokers Price Opinion (BPO)

When you do a short sale, the lender most likely will order a BPO.

BPO stands for Brokers Price Opinion and is a process by which a realtor

appointed by the lender, comes out to evaluate the property and give his “opinion”

on what the value of the property is. So the lender sends a realtor out to the

property and it’s your job to influence the BPO to come down as low as you can.

This is the whole key to a successful short sale. This is why you want the lender to

contact you, so you can meet the realtor at the front door and influence their

BPO to come in as low as possible. To build your case, the first thing you

should do is show up with a list of repairs and estimates for the property. If you

have to go get a contractor to bid a job or repair, go get one. The higher the quote,

the better. This is good evidence. The second thing you should do is show up with

a list of comps in the area that are low. Most real estate agents appreciate you

doing some of their work for them. Provide them with the lowest comps you can

find and they will decide if they want to use them or not.

When you meet the realtor on the property steps, just tell him you are the buyer and

doing a short sale on the house. Then you will proceed to walk the realtor

through the property. When you are walking through the property make sure you

point any and every repair or problem with the property. Again, you are trying to

make the value of the home come in as low as possible. If you are dealing with a

nice house with minor cosmetics, you may really have to search for problems.

Then call him the next morning to see if he was able to get the price you wanted. Sometimes they will tell you sometimes they won’t. Just ask to find out. If they won’t tell you, call the bank. Many times they will tell you. You really have no control over this process. You can encourage the BPO to come in low, but this does not always mean they will come in low.

If there is someone living in the property, you may want to ask them to leave when

the realtor comes out to do a BPO. If they can’t, just tell them to stay out

of the way. Explain to them you will be trying to make the house value look as low

as possible. They may not understand why, just tell them it is the only way to save

their house. Also, tell them not to worry about cleaning up at all, leave it the way it

is. This is the one time your house can be a mess. You need to make the value of

the property look as low as possible.

If the loan on the property is FHA or VA, they will not take less than 82% of the BPO.

Usually you can expect the BPO to be in the range of 80-90% of the

repaired value. So if you have a house that is worth $120,000 after repairs, the BPO

you would guess to be about $98,000 to $108,000. Then multiply that amount by

82% and this should give you a good estimate of what to offer. If it is not a VA/FHA

loan, then you can offer whatever you want. It is a good idea to start low, just in

case your BPO comes back lower than you thought, you can always raise the offer. It

is an educated guess to find out what the BPO will be. If it comes back

high not in your favor, sometimes you can call the loss mitigation department and

tell them the BPO is way to high. Many times they will work with you and

order another BPO. Whatever you do, don’t ever give up. If they don’t accept it,

negotiate with them some more. Ask them what they are looking for, or what they

are trying to get. Sometimes they will tell you, sometimes they won’t. Be

persistence. Be patient. Ask, ask, ask. Part of being successful in this business is

how you negotiate. You don’t ever want to be rude to them, but let them know

where you stand. Make them aware of what’s happening to the property.

Foreclosure Hardship Letter – Sample For Bank Loss Mitigation Department

A foreclosure hardship letter is an integral part of Loan Modification or Short Sale package. When homeowners are facing foreclosure, these documents are submitted to the Loss Mitigation Department of the mortgage lender. Loan modifications are offered to homeowners who have the financial ability to become current on delinquent payments. Short sales are offered to homeowners who do not have the financial means to pay their mortgage payments. Lenders who accept short sales offers agree to accept less than is owed on the mortgage note.

For most people, the foreclosure hardship letter is the most difficult aspect of loan modification or short sale procedures. It can be excruciatingly painful to express on paper the circumstances which caused the homeowner to fall behind on their mortgage payments. Many people are intimidated by the hardship letter. They don’t know what to say or how to format the letter so it is easy to read and understand.

Keep in mind, foreclosures and short sales are handled by the Loss Mitigation Department of your lender. Employees of this department are referred to as Loss Mitigators. Before you can submit a loan modification or short sale package, you must receive approval from the Loss Mitigator assigned to your account.

More than likely, you will have ample opportunities to personally speak to the Loss Mitigator handling your account. These individuals deal with homeowners in financial distress on a daily basis. Take advantage of building a relationship with your assigned mitigator and ask questions to help you better understand what your mitigator expects. Loss mitigators can make or break your deal, so always treat them with respect and provide them the information they request.

Your foreclosure hardship letter will be read by your personal loss mitigator. Realize these individuals receive dozens of hardship letters daily. Therefore, it is crucial to keep your letter short and to the point, while covering pertinent facts.

When composing your hardship letter you can either write it by hand or type it. If your handwriting is illegible, it is best to type the letter or have someone else write it for you. The foreclosure hardship letter is one of the most crucial elements of your loan modification or short sale package, so take every precaution to ensure the Loss Mitigator can easily read and understand it.

Real estate experts recommend using a business format for the foreclosure hardship letter. This involves placing your name, address, city, zip and phone number at the top of the page. Leave two spaces, then write the name of your loss mitigator, name of your mortgage lender, along with their mailing address. The next line should include the current date. Place your loan number underneath the date. The body of the letter should be between four and six paragraphs. Close the letter by signing and printing your name.

The following is an example of the foreclosure hardship letter. You can make adjustments to the text depending on if you are seeking a loan modification or short sale arrangement.

Bob and Jane Smith

123 Any Street

Your City, State 12345

Tom Jones

USA Lender

123 Anywhere Avenue, Suite A

Anytown, State 12345

Current Date

RE: Your Loan Number (include either Loan Modification or Short Sale)

Dear Mr. Jones,

We are contacting you today to request a (loan modification or short sale) for our property located at (insert address, city, state). We appreciate the opportunity to explain the circumstances which have caused us to fall behind on our mortgage payments. Although we have done everything possible to improve our financial situation, we are still short on the money owed to you.

The reason we have become delinquent in our mortgage payments is (explain the reason here). At this time we do not have enough income to pay our regular monthly mortgage payment. We are concerned that we are falling further behind and will not be able to pay what is owed. We have every intention of paying what is owed, but at this time do not know how to accomplish this. Therefore, we are turning to you for assistance.

We are asking for consideration to temporarily reduce or suspend our mortgage payments for a few months (or allow us to sell our home via a short sale). Doing so, would help us get back on track. Our home means a great deal to us and we desire to work with you to keep it out of foreclosure. Please advise of all options available to stop foreclosure (or initiate a short sale) at your earliest convenience. We are anxious to reach an agreement and appreciate your prompt response.

Respectfully yours,

Print name of Borrower(s)

Signature of Borrower(s)

Loan #

Address

Phone

email address (if applicable)

It is imperative to send the foreclosure hardship letter via certified mail with a return receipt requested. This will ensure you have proof you sent the letter. The return receipt must be signed by someone at the lending institution and the signature card will be returned to you in the mail.

Is A Short Sale The Right Choice?

With the decline in home values in the past few years, some homeowners who need to sell in the current market find themselves trapped, as they owe more than their home is worth. In this situation, the short sale can become a viable option.

What is a short sale:

A short sale is simply a sale in which the proceeds are not enough to cover all of the outstanding obligations associated with the sale of the home including the mortgage or mortgages, unpaid property taxes, attorney’s fees, title expenses, commissions, etc. This shortage would require the seller to bring money to the closing or to negotiate a “shorted” payoff with their lender. The lender has no obligation to agree to this, but many will. In most cases, a short sale is attempted by sellers who are facing foreclosure or have fallen behind and no longer have the ability to continue making their payments.

The process:

There are a lot of misconceptions about the short sale process and the lender’s role in it, even among some RealtorĀ®s. The seller’s lender’s role is nothing more than that of a contingency. This can vary by state depending on whether it’s a title theory state or lien theory state. This information applies to Illinois, which is a lien theory state (the owner holds title and the lender holds a lien on the property)

The seller owns the home and ultimately is the one who, with the help of their agent, accepts, rejects or proposes a counter offer once an offer is received. When the offer is accepted by the seller, it is done so contingent on their lender agreeing to accept the net proceeds of the sale as full settlement of the amounts owed. I’ve had more than one occasion where an agent working for a buyer asks when their offer will be submitted to the bank, even before the seller has agreed to accept it. It can add to the confusion if multiple offers are received. Some think that all offers must be presented to the lender. This is not accurate. All offers must be presented to the seller, not to the lender. The goal of the listing agent should be to obtain the best offer possible, thereby giving the transaction the best possible chance of actually closing.

What are the odds of a successful closing?

They’re actually better than they used to be. Nowadays it makes sense for banks to seriously consider accepting a short sale as, in many cases, they net more money overall versus going through the whole foreclosure process, taking the home back and marketing it as an REO (Real Estate Owned). Illinois is a judicial foreclosure state. Some states are non-judicial. Judicial foreclosures take much more time to complete. In Illinois, the process can take a year or more. There are some states which take upwards of 3 years. When you consider that, in most cases, the bank is receiving nothing while the process drags along, you start to see their motivation to consider other options. Add to this the deterioration to the property during that time and the additional carrying costs, and the benefits to the bank become even more clear. The bank in this situation, much like the homeowner, is looking for the best way to limit their losses.

The benefits of a short sale:

Lenders generally don’t allow the seller to receive any of the proceeds of the sale. This is fair when you consider that the whole basis of the short sale is negotiating with the lender to get them to take less than what they’re owed. The only exception I’ve seen to this was years ago when, due to an error, we were out of balance by $.06 The title company actually cut a check to the seller for six cents! As a seller in this situation, one needs to keep in mind that, if the lender agrees to the short sale, they are allowing the seller to avoid having a foreclosure on their record which follows them around for many years. Additionally, most short sales also let the seller out from under the debt without being chased for a deficiency. These two things should be all the motivation you need. there are no guarantees of being successful but it’s certainly worth the effort.

Who should you call?

These transactions are not for beginners. There is no substitute for experience when it comes to navigating through this process. An experienced agent and attorney are crucial. In this situation it makes sense to ask a lot of questions. There are specialized short sale/foreclosure courses available for agents. Some are very worthwhile but these courses alone don’t necessarily make the agent an expert. An agent referred by a seller who’s been through this process is definitely someone worth talking to.

What will it cost?

In most cases, it will cost you nothing unless there’s an upfront fee charged by the agent to list the home. All agents negotiate their own fees. It should cost you nothing to talk to an agent and get information. All commissions and other closing costs a seller would normally pay will be factored in and, if the lender agrees to the short sale, they are agreeing to the net amount of the sale so essentially, it is the lender that is paying your closing costs. For someone facing foreclosure, a short sale can be an excellent solution.

Foreclosure Woes

If your mortgage is at a very large bank, you have made a mistake! Trying to work out a solution to your deficiency is very complicated and the service is lousy. Your foreclosure woes have begun!

A friend was delinquent with her mortgage payments. She had owned her property for 37 years. The bank filed the papers to put the property in receivership (foreclosure action) to the bank. The friend immediately phoned the bank to see if there was anything she could do. She worked out a plan with the bank to reduce her payments and followed through for 13 months of on-time, full, adjusted payments. When she attempted to make the 14th payment, the bank returned it.

One day, she received a notice that her home was scheduled for a “Sheriff’s Sale.” Puzzled by the notice, she immediately phoned the bank and was told that they did not need to file any more legal papers, since they had previously filed the necessary papers (before she made the arrangements) and the application for Obama mortgage assistance had been rejected. What this means is that the deficit, the difference between payments under existing mortgage and the adjusted payments while the Obama mortgage assistance modification application was awaiting approval or rejection, was due in full when the application was rejected. Example: Payment under existing mortgage, $1100; payment under Obama mortgage assistance, $700. Rejection would mean $400 X 13 or $5,200 would be due immediately and there could be fees attached. During the 13 months, no statement showing her account was ever provided by the bank. She was advised that when a mortgage is in default, the bank has no legal obligation to provide a statement of the account.

The bank purchased the property at the “Sheriff’s Sale”. Did you know that following a “Sheriff’s Sale” and confirmation of the sale, the bank (buyer) only must give you 48 hours to vacate? Furthermore, you will have all these strangers entering your property to complete various tasks on behalf of the lender/buyer (the bank).

People all around me are losing their homes due to foreclosure. It is almost a repeat of the Great Depression. The exception is that in the Great Depression, saved money placed with banks was also lost. Today, bank accounts are insured by the FDIC.

What brought this dilemma on? My thoughts on this are that credit was “too easy”! On the lender side, banks and mortgage companies were willing to be liable for too much mortgage. On the buyer side, a lack of concern and understanding of how much debt was being taken on. No one planned on losing a job or other circumstances, not being able to meet those mortgage payments. You always want the lowest payment possible at the lowest interest rate. I personally experienced this. When times are tough, you need to work closely with your lender. In 1946, a family member, who owned with a mortgage loan, sometimes only made the interest payment of the mortgage due to hardship. They did not lose their property but many years later, paid it off. Could this be a solution to the present day foreclosure woes?

The Obama Making Home Affordable program (loan modification program) is a complete disaster. Those who really need the help are not getting it. A recent conversation with my banker revealed the seminars attended by the financial employees of mortgage lending institutions left them with a big blank trying to understand what the heck it is supposed to do. The mortgage lending firms are less than helpful to the customers who have or will be very shortly losing their homes. One application was returned reject because the owner’s income was too low. Isn’t that what a loan modification should be considering when reviewing need? Very few people have been approved under the Making Home Affordable program.

If you are having a problem making your mortgage loan payments, the best thing you can do is visit your lender in person and suggest that maybe you could just pay the interest on the loan for a period of time.

Obviously, not being able to pay your mortgage payment is a very serious situation and should be avoided at all costs, even to the point of putting the property up for sale. You will not see a penny of your equity should you allow your lender to foreclose. It is also very important that your mortgage lender is local.

How Soon Can You Be Evicted After The Foreclosure Sheriff Sale?

Homeowners in foreclosure are rightfully worried about not being able to save their homes and how quickly they will be evicted after the sheriff sale. Although the lender and various “experts” will threaten them with the sheriff showing up the next day to violently kick them out of the house, this is just not the case in foreclosure situation. The county sheriff and the eviction crew will not show up the next day after the sheriff sale, and homeowners should ignore the fear-mongering that threatens this possibility.

Owners should be aware of the implications of the foreclosure auction, though. The sheriff sale will transfer ownership of the property, and the foreclosure victims will not own the house after this point. But this does not mean that the eviction process will happen automatically right after the house is auctioned, as there are more steps that will need to be taken by the new owner.

The high bidder at the auction will most likely have to have the sheriff sale confirmed (this is not a specifically detailed step in every state). This can take from a few days to a couple of weeks after the auction, depending on how quickly the courts and new owner act. But this is generally just a simple step in the foreclosure process after the sale that involves the sheriff and judge confirming the auction was for a legal amount and that the deed has now been awarded to the new owner.

The new owner will most likely be the original foreclosing bank that the homeowners had been dealing with in the first place to stop foreclosure. About 95% of foreclosures end up being purchased by the lender, rather than a third party.

In order to evict former homeowners, the lender will have to request the court grant it possession of the property and order the county sheriff to evict any remaining people or personal items and change the locks. This is a legal process, though. Homeowners should not fear that a bunch of government thugs with badges and guns will show up at their house the day after the sheriff sale to kick them out. Of course, this is exactly what happens, but at a later date if the foreclosure victims do not move out in time.

But the entire eviction process can take up to a month after the sale; throwing people out of their homes is not a simple process before or after a county auction. The court will have no problem ordering the eviction (unless the former owners go and try to contest the sale, eviction order, etc.), but the sheriff’s department will have to give notice of the impending removal. This can be as little as posting a piece of paper on the property with three days notice to move. Thus, after the sheriff sale, former homeowners better be prepared to leave on their own or work out another solution.

People facing foreclosure should not be overly concerned about being kicked out of a house with little notice. The sheriff will not just show up the next day or a few hours after the sheriff sale, as there is still a legal process that must be followed for a bank to take back possession of a foreclosed property. Homeowners probably have at least two weeks to a month after the sheriff sale date to arrange for a new place to move into.

In any event, homeowners are always encouraged to call the sheriff’s department to ask them when then eviction will take place. Even more promising, they can also usually ask for a few extra days or a week in order to move everything out and give up the house peacefully. There is still a chance to negotiate with the local government for more time (courts and sheriff) so that the former owners are not taken by surprise by the eviction.

Thus, the banks and government officials will not evict foreclosure victims right away after the auction, but there is no time to spare, either. Having a couple of weeks to move out can give people a chance to find a place and move in at their own pace, but even a month-long eviction process will go by very quickly. If in doubt, homeowners should contact their local government officials and ask about the eviction — the courts or sheriff will be able to inform them of the date and try to work out the most reasonable solution. They want as little trouble after foreclosure as the former homeowners do.

Capitalize on Pre-Foreclosure Listings For Potentially Higher Profits

A home that is a pre-foreclosure listing is one that is in between the time when the first Notice of Sale has been issued by the bank, and the actual foreclosure auction where the home sells or the bank takes possession. There are ninety days given to the home owner to clear up the outstanding debt on the home, before the actual foreclosure happens. During this time an investor, or home buyer, has a great opportunity to capitalize of the pre-foreclosure listings.

Find Quality Pre-Foreclosure Listings

To get the best deal, you need to find the best quality homes. Look in the weekly newspaper for pre-foreclosure listings, and check out your counties records office. These will have the recent listings for you to check out.

Get A Home Inspection

If you find a home that you might be interested in take this opportunity to have a home inspection done. You might have to pay for this, but it is worth it if you plan to go ahead with purchasing the home.

Two Buying Options

After you know that the pre-foreclosure listing can be a good investment opportunity, then you have two options open to you as a buyer.

First, you can make an offer directly to the home owner themselves. Get your offer in writing, this is made a lot easier when you get a real estate agent to help you, and present it to the home owner. During this time, if the owner is still in the home, they will want to sell to avoid actual foreclosure and any credit damage. Most times, a pre-foreclosure listing can be bought here and at a very good, below market value price.

The second way is to wait until the foreclosure auction. If you have determined that the home is worthy of bidding on, and the homeowner is either absent or doesn’t want to sell for a lower price, then you can bid at auction.