5 Ways to Stop Foreclosure Immediately – Don’t Let the Bank Destroy Your Family

There are various ways to stop foreclosure immediately, but the most common way homeowners can prevent foreclosure is by using the loan modification process. During this time of financial unrest, getting out of a bad financial situation is not really unheard of. Families today have options and lenders are willing to work with your family to keep you in your home. The following ideas could help keep the stress off your shoulders and the creditors and loan collectors off your back.

1: Refinance your original loan. Money lenders will consider foreclosure refinance loans if they feel you will not neglect making payments to them. Qualifying for refinancing is tough and the requirements are strict. The requirements include equity from your home and a steady income. Although the payments may turn out to be higher some homeowners prefer to start off fresh and use refinance as one of the ways to stop foreclosure of their family home. But let’s face it; there has to be an easier way.

2: Selling to a relative or close friend to prevent foreclosure may be your only way out temporarily. You will be out of your financial situation and be able to have them carry you for a while until you land back on your feet. You can lease or rent back the property from them until you are financially able to buy the property back. But if you don’t feel safe or trusting with the people you’ll be working with; this option may turn into a way for family or friend to make a quick profit selling your home at a reduced rate.

3: Try bankruptcy to stop a foreclosure in progress, but this can become an expensive alternative. The amount of payments which need to be made to satisfy the creditors and bankruptcy costs make this an option for those who have a large amount of disposable income. Let’s face it if disposable income is available your family wouldn’t be in this situation.

4: One of the easiest ways to stop foreclosure immediately is to sell the property outright before the foreclosure has time to proceed. If you can get enough for your home paying off your debt in time will stop the foreclosure from proceeding but will leave your family looking for a new place to live.

5: Work with an online loan modification service to prevent or stop a foreclosure from going through. This type of service will work with your lender to help rework your arrangement in order for your family to keep their home. The banks would prefer to get paid and not have to deal with trying to sell your home. This option will at the very least help you to repair your credit and hopefully prepare you to purchase another home in the future.

Foreclosure – How Long Before I Lose My House?

Many homeowners have questions about how foreclosure works and how long they have between when they miss a payment and when the bank actually forecloses. If you’re wondering how long you have before you have to leave, it depends on whether your case will be handled in a judicial foreclosure or in a non-judicial foreclosure. Most states allow both, but some states only allow one or the other, so you’ll have to research to find out which your is for sure, but there’s a good chance yours will be non-judicial because it moves faster and costs less for the lender.

All Foreclosures

– You miss your first payment (for example, we’ll say this is your July payment and it was due on July 1).

– Your grace period expires (usually 15 days) and you haven’t paid. Your payment is now considered late by your lender. It’s not uncommon to begin getting letters or phone calls from them at this point. Don’t ignore these phone calls.

– At most lenders, once you’re 60 days late (September 2 in our case), your loan is considered in default and the lender can begin either the Judicial or Non-Judicial foreclosure process. To bring your loan current at this point, you’ll usually be required to pay all past due amounts (your July and August payments), all late fees, and your September payment.

This is where lenders have the most flexibility in the process. They aren’t required to enter the foreclosure process simply because you’ve fallen a certain number of days behind. If you’re in communication with them and have worked out a plan to get back current, you can stay out of foreclosure altogether, but you have to take action.

Judicial Foreclosures

– Your lender’s lawyer will file a complaint with your county courthouse and request a court date. This typically doesn’t happen until you’re over 90 days late.

– You’ll be served a notice of this complaint.

– A hearing will be held in your county to determine the sufficiency of the complaint. If you believe you have legal grounds to dispute the foreclosure, this is where you and your lawyer would argue those grounds. At the end of this hearing, the judge will rule whether the complaint is sufficient or not. If it is, the foreclosure sale will be scheduled and your credit record will be marked as having a foreclosure. If it’s not sufficient, the judge will dismiss it. How long all of this takes is dependent upon the courts in your area. Typically, it takes about 30 – 60 days.

– A date will be set for redemption of the property if your state laws stipulate. You can still bring your loan current (including fees, etc) until the redemption date. Even if the house has been sold and someone has moved in, if the redemption date hasn’t passed, you can still get your house back…if you can get enough money.

– A date will be set for the foreclosure auction. This usually happens about 30 – 45 days after the sufficiency hearing.

*** A Judicial foreclosure typically takes anywhere from 6 months to 2 years from start to finish. ***

Non-Judicial Foreclosures

– Your lender will send you a Notice of Default in the mail.

– Your lender will send you a Notice of Sale to tell you when your home will be sold at the foreclosure auction.

*** A Non-Judicial foreclosure typically takes anywhere from 1 month to 1 year to complete. ***

All Foreclosures

– The foreclosure sale happens and your house is sold. In approximately 90 – 95% of cases, the owner of your first mortgage wins the auction because they bid the amount that you owe on that loan and usually no one else will go higher than that.

The owner of your home then contacts the county sheriff who posts a notice of eviction on your door. This notice gives you 24 – 72 hours to leave the house and have all of your possessions out. If you’re there when the sheriff returns, he will escort of off the premises and anything left on or in the property will then belong to the new homeowner.

Foreclosure Hunting For Cell Tower Leases

Real estate investors who buy foreclosures are finding more and more apartment buildings with existing cellular antenna leases. Cell tower leases can be the foreclosure buyer’s best friend. However, buying foreclosed properties with a cell site lease is not easy, but the deals are out there. Even the savvy real estate investor who buys a lot of foreclosures is probably not going to be a telecom leasing expert, and frankly even the real estate investing experts don’t know squat about how to deal with a cell tower lease when you buy a foreclosed building.

A cellular antenna lease will either be attached to cell tower on raw land or rooftop cellular antenna installation on commercial or residential property. If the property is a foreclosure and the bank is not yet the receiver, it’s going to be difficult getting the information unless the Owner/Landlord is cooperative and trusts you enough to let you look at the lease. There really isn’t a way to identify these types of foreclosure properties. These types of deals are very difficult to find, and we recommend that you don’t waste your time chasing these rainbows. Focus on the low hanging fruit: bank owned residential apartment buildings and commercial properties.

It’s much easier looking for REO’s with existing cellular tenants. If the property is bank owned, as the receiver they need to disclose every existing lease encumbering the Premises prior to sale, and it’s in their best interest to provide the details of the lease or if your are lucky… multiple carrier leases.

You need to figure out the value of the lease. You want to know the commencement date of the lease, which is the date that they started paying the Owner after cell site approval. You want to know the amount of rent they are paying monthly, and what the annual increases are that the previous owner agreed to, and how many years are remaining on the back end of the lease. The particular cellular carrier will also determine the value of cell tower lease on Wall Street.

How can real estate investors find foreclosure properties that have cellular carriers as a tenant?

This is where you need to be creative. Good foreclosure investors have their bird dogs who send them deals. Chances are that they never thought about looking for foreclosures with cellular antenna site leases. Your best bet is to network with your bank’s foreclosure specialist or REO Manager.

All major banks have buildings on their books with cellular site leases which they aren’t marketing to investors. They are simply too busy to pull together a database of foreclosed properties with existing wireless carrier tenants.

Successful real estate investors who want to find these deals should tap into their existing relationships at the banks that do business in the territory that they operate in to identify potential deals that have existing cellular leases and where the bank is acting as the receiver. Ask your banker to scan their foreclosure property / REO database for terms such as Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, Omnipoint, Cellco, Sprint, Nextel, Alltel, Cingular, AT&T, Metro PCS, Crown, Towerco, SBA, or American Tower. If you find a foreclosed property or building with a cell tower lease attached, you can significantly sweeten the deal for yourself because you can pull cash out of the cellular lease – often times six figure amounts – and put it towards the mortgage or towards buying another building.

It’s also a very good idea to have a cell tower leasing expert review the terms of your lease, which disqualifies 99% of real estate attorneys.

Creative Foreclosure Avoidance Solution: Mortgage Assumption

You’re in a situation where you’re already three months late on your mortgage. Fortunately, no foreclosure lawsuits have taken place and you still have options. Your wife is starting to wonder why you’re always worried. She hasn’t received the memo. The dream house that you and your family purchased several years ago is turning out to be more than you can handle, especially with all of the unexpected bills popping up left and right. If you don’t do something soon, you’ll find yourself and your family in a very bad situation.

Looking at your situation, you can see that your property is in good shape less normal wear and tear. You can’t sell without having to come to closing with at least $35,000.00 which you don’t have right now. The reason for this is a house down the block in better condition sold last month for $150,000.00. You owe $185,000.00 and no one is willing to pay that much for your property. You don’t like the idea of doing a Short Sale as you’ve heard of the many horror stories that people go through during and after the process. Your credit does not get affected as much as it would after a foreclosure but it still takes a hit. In addition, there is still about a 35% chance that the bank may still come after you for the difference and that won’t be any fun. To top it all off the success rates of Short Sales are about fifty percent among the industry.

Listing with a Realtor and waiting for a buyer is pointless as you can’t come to closing with the difference and doing a Short Sale is definitely out of the question. Here is something that you might not have thought of: Mortgage Assumption. Some people call it different things such as Subject To the existing mortgage or Mortgage Management.

Mortgage Assumption involves transferring the deed of your property to another buyer in exchange for their bringing the mortgage current and maintaining payments. In the Real Estate market of 2013 – 2018, it’s very hard to get approved for a mortgage among American locals. This method of doing business opens the doors to thousands of buyers who, due to various circumstances, can’t qualify for a mortgage.

Your best bet in this situation is to work with a seasoned professional Real Estate buyer who can either assume the mortgage himself or find several interested parties to do so. There are not many professionals who know how to legally structure this correctly and finding an agent who knows how to do this is like finding a needle in a haystack. Find a well connected Real Estate investor who can assist you and allow you to move on with your life and preserve and maintain your good credit standing.

Foreclosure Hardship Letter – Sample For Bank Loss Mitigation Department

A foreclosure hardship letter is an integral part of Loan Modification or Short Sale package. When homeowners are facing foreclosure, these documents are submitted to the Loss Mitigation Department of the mortgage lender. Loan modifications are offered to homeowners who have the financial ability to become current on delinquent payments. Short sales are offered to homeowners who do not have the financial means to pay their mortgage payments. Lenders who accept short sales offers agree to accept less than is owed on the mortgage note.

For most people, the foreclosure hardship letter is the most difficult aspect of loan modification or short sale procedures. It can be excruciatingly painful to express on paper the circumstances which caused the homeowner to fall behind on their mortgage payments. Many people are intimidated by the hardship letter. They don’t know what to say or how to format the letter so it is easy to read and understand.

Keep in mind, foreclosures and short sales are handled by the Loss Mitigation Department of your lender. Employees of this department are referred to as Loss Mitigators. Before you can submit a loan modification or short sale package, you must receive approval from the Loss Mitigator assigned to your account.

More than likely, you will have ample opportunities to personally speak to the Loss Mitigator handling your account. These individuals deal with homeowners in financial distress on a daily basis. Take advantage of building a relationship with your assigned mitigator and ask questions to help you better understand what your mitigator expects. Loss mitigators can make or break your deal, so always treat them with respect and provide them the information they request.

Your foreclosure hardship letter will be read by your personal loss mitigator. Realize these individuals receive dozens of hardship letters daily. Therefore, it is crucial to keep your letter short and to the point, while covering pertinent facts.

When composing your hardship letter you can either write it by hand or type it. If your handwriting is illegible, it is best to type the letter or have someone else write it for you. The foreclosure hardship letter is one of the most crucial elements of your loan modification or short sale package, so take every precaution to ensure the Loss Mitigator can easily read and understand it.

Real estate experts recommend using a business format for the foreclosure hardship letter. This involves placing your name, address, city, zip and phone number at the top of the page. Leave two spaces, then write the name of your loss mitigator, name of your mortgage lender, along with their mailing address. The next line should include the current date. Place your loan number underneath the date. The body of the letter should be between four and six paragraphs. Close the letter by signing and printing your name.

The following is an example of the foreclosure hardship letter. You can make adjustments to the text depending on if you are seeking a loan modification or short sale arrangement.

Bob and Jane Smith

123 Any Street

Your City, State 12345

Tom Jones

USA Lender

123 Anywhere Avenue, Suite A

Anytown, State 12345

Current Date

RE: Your Loan Number (include either Loan Modification or Short Sale)

Dear Mr. Jones,

We are contacting you today to request a (loan modification or short sale) for our property located at (insert address, city, state). We appreciate the opportunity to explain the circumstances which have caused us to fall behind on our mortgage payments. Although we have done everything possible to improve our financial situation, we are still short on the money owed to you.

The reason we have become delinquent in our mortgage payments is (explain the reason here). At this time we do not have enough income to pay our regular monthly mortgage payment. We are concerned that we are falling further behind and will not be able to pay what is owed. We have every intention of paying what is owed, but at this time do not know how to accomplish this. Therefore, we are turning to you for assistance.

We are asking for consideration to temporarily reduce or suspend our mortgage payments for a few months (or allow us to sell our home via a short sale). Doing so, would help us get back on track. Our home means a great deal to us and we desire to work with you to keep it out of foreclosure. Please advise of all options available to stop foreclosure (or initiate a short sale) at your earliest convenience. We are anxious to reach an agreement and appreciate your prompt response.

Respectfully yours,

Print name of Borrower(s)

Signature of Borrower(s)

Loan #

Address

Phone

email address (if applicable)

It is imperative to send the foreclosure hardship letter via certified mail with a return receipt requested. This will ensure you have proof you sent the letter. The return receipt must be signed by someone at the lending institution and the signature card will be returned to you in the mail.

Foreclosure Woes

If your mortgage is at a very large bank, you have made a mistake! Trying to work out a solution to your deficiency is very complicated and the service is lousy. Your foreclosure woes have begun!

A friend was delinquent with her mortgage payments. She had owned her property for 37 years. The bank filed the papers to put the property in receivership (foreclosure action) to the bank. The friend immediately phoned the bank to see if there was anything she could do. She worked out a plan with the bank to reduce her payments and followed through for 13 months of on-time, full, adjusted payments. When she attempted to make the 14th payment, the bank returned it.

One day, she received a notice that her home was scheduled for a “Sheriff’s Sale.” Puzzled by the notice, she immediately phoned the bank and was told that they did not need to file any more legal papers, since they had previously filed the necessary papers (before she made the arrangements) and the application for Obama mortgage assistance had been rejected. What this means is that the deficit, the difference between payments under existing mortgage and the adjusted payments while the Obama mortgage assistance modification application was awaiting approval or rejection, was due in full when the application was rejected. Example: Payment under existing mortgage, $1100; payment under Obama mortgage assistance, $700. Rejection would mean $400 X 13 or $5,200 would be due immediately and there could be fees attached. During the 13 months, no statement showing her account was ever provided by the bank. She was advised that when a mortgage is in default, the bank has no legal obligation to provide a statement of the account.

The bank purchased the property at the “Sheriff’s Sale”. Did you know that following a “Sheriff’s Sale” and confirmation of the sale, the bank (buyer) only must give you 48 hours to vacate? Furthermore, you will have all these strangers entering your property to complete various tasks on behalf of the lender/buyer (the bank).

People all around me are losing their homes due to foreclosure. It is almost a repeat of the Great Depression. The exception is that in the Great Depression, saved money placed with banks was also lost. Today, bank accounts are insured by the FDIC.

What brought this dilemma on? My thoughts on this are that credit was “too easy”! On the lender side, banks and mortgage companies were willing to be liable for too much mortgage. On the buyer side, a lack of concern and understanding of how much debt was being taken on. No one planned on losing a job or other circumstances, not being able to meet those mortgage payments. You always want the lowest payment possible at the lowest interest rate. I personally experienced this. When times are tough, you need to work closely with your lender. In 1946, a family member, who owned with a mortgage loan, sometimes only made the interest payment of the mortgage due to hardship. They did not lose their property but many years later, paid it off. Could this be a solution to the present day foreclosure woes?

The Obama Making Home Affordable program (loan modification program) is a complete disaster. Those who really need the help are not getting it. A recent conversation with my banker revealed the seminars attended by the financial employees of mortgage lending institutions left them with a big blank trying to understand what the heck it is supposed to do. The mortgage lending firms are less than helpful to the customers who have or will be very shortly losing their homes. One application was returned reject because the owner’s income was too low. Isn’t that what a loan modification should be considering when reviewing need? Very few people have been approved under the Making Home Affordable program.

If you are having a problem making your mortgage loan payments, the best thing you can do is visit your lender in person and suggest that maybe you could just pay the interest on the loan for a period of time.

Obviously, not being able to pay your mortgage payment is a very serious situation and should be avoided at all costs, even to the point of putting the property up for sale. You will not see a penny of your equity should you allow your lender to foreclose. It is also very important that your mortgage lender is local.

How Soon Can You Be Evicted After The Foreclosure Sheriff Sale?

Homeowners in foreclosure are rightfully worried about not being able to save their homes and how quickly they will be evicted after the sheriff sale. Although the lender and various “experts” will threaten them with the sheriff showing up the next day to violently kick them out of the house, this is just not the case in foreclosure situation. The county sheriff and the eviction crew will not show up the next day after the sheriff sale, and homeowners should ignore the fear-mongering that threatens this possibility.

Owners should be aware of the implications of the foreclosure auction, though. The sheriff sale will transfer ownership of the property, and the foreclosure victims will not own the house after this point. But this does not mean that the eviction process will happen automatically right after the house is auctioned, as there are more steps that will need to be taken by the new owner.

The high bidder at the auction will most likely have to have the sheriff sale confirmed (this is not a specifically detailed step in every state). This can take from a few days to a couple of weeks after the auction, depending on how quickly the courts and new owner act. But this is generally just a simple step in the foreclosure process after the sale that involves the sheriff and judge confirming the auction was for a legal amount and that the deed has now been awarded to the new owner.

The new owner will most likely be the original foreclosing bank that the homeowners had been dealing with in the first place to stop foreclosure. About 95% of foreclosures end up being purchased by the lender, rather than a third party.

In order to evict former homeowners, the lender will have to request the court grant it possession of the property and order the county sheriff to evict any remaining people or personal items and change the locks. This is a legal process, though. Homeowners should not fear that a bunch of government thugs with badges and guns will show up at their house the day after the sheriff sale to kick them out. Of course, this is exactly what happens, but at a later date if the foreclosure victims do not move out in time.

But the entire eviction process can take up to a month after the sale; throwing people out of their homes is not a simple process before or after a county auction. The court will have no problem ordering the eviction (unless the former owners go and try to contest the sale, eviction order, etc.), but the sheriff’s department will have to give notice of the impending removal. This can be as little as posting a piece of paper on the property with three days notice to move. Thus, after the sheriff sale, former homeowners better be prepared to leave on their own or work out another solution.

People facing foreclosure should not be overly concerned about being kicked out of a house with little notice. The sheriff will not just show up the next day or a few hours after the sheriff sale, as there is still a legal process that must be followed for a bank to take back possession of a foreclosed property. Homeowners probably have at least two weeks to a month after the sheriff sale date to arrange for a new place to move into.

In any event, homeowners are always encouraged to call the sheriff’s department to ask them when then eviction will take place. Even more promising, they can also usually ask for a few extra days or a week in order to move everything out and give up the house peacefully. There is still a chance to negotiate with the local government for more time (courts and sheriff) so that the former owners are not taken by surprise by the eviction.

Thus, the banks and government officials will not evict foreclosure victims right away after the auction, but there is no time to spare, either. Having a couple of weeks to move out can give people a chance to find a place and move in at their own pace, but even a month-long eviction process will go by very quickly. If in doubt, homeowners should contact their local government officials and ask about the eviction — the courts or sheriff will be able to inform them of the date and try to work out the most reasonable solution. They want as little trouble after foreclosure as the former homeowners do.

Five Good Books on Foreclosure Fraud

According to Waters of Marketwatch.com, Mortgage and real estate-related frauds is the ninth most prevalent consumer scams this year, with the fake landlord and timeshare resale complaints getting the most attention from the authorities.

Ever since the Housing bubble in 2008, the incidences of mortgage-related frauds and scams have escalated to an alarming degree. Numerous homeowners have lost their homes and properties due to scam victimization, and more cases are still being reported even up to this very hour. Everyday scam artists develop new ways of tricking money out of innocent people, which accounts for why new numbers are being added to the scam victims’ statistics despite government awareness campaigns.

The fact is that it isn’t enough for consumers to entrust the issue of foreclosure scams and rip offs to federal and state agencies. Nowadays, the state and its citizen must employ a collaborative approach to fight against this type of fraudulent activities. The agencies are doing their part by busting professional and white-collared criminals. The citizens, on the other hand, should take the responsibility of educating and updating themselves about the latest scam profiles and techniques.

In light of this, several books and instructional materials about real-estate scams have been released in the market. Many authors, real-estate experts, and concerned opinion leaders have written useful tips about the scam industry to empower the regular citizens. This article is dedicated to five of the most helpful books on this subject.

Five Books of Foreclosure Fraud

People Get Screwed All the Time: Protecting Yourself From Scams, Fraud, Identity Theft, Fine Print, and More, 2007, Robert Massi

This 368-page book doesn’t just focus on real estate scams, it also covers other types of fraud that could potentially hit individuals anytime. Even though it was written by an attorney, this book aims to explain the US federal laws and its effect on citizens’ lives in plain English. Getting past through the intense scrutiny of the federal government, this book will provide you with invaluable knowledge about the loopholes in our government and what you should do to avoid being victimized by these loopholes. The book presents the subject matter in an engaging manner by using the actual experiences and stories that people can relate to. After reading this, it’s less possible that you would get caught up in undesirable after-scam situations.

 The Truth about Avoiding Scams, 2008, by Steve Weisman


“Scams can be high tech, low tech, or no tech – be prepared.”

Weisman tells about the truth on several fraud and scam activities waiting to victimize people. In this book, you can view an entire chapter for real-estate related fraud in “The Truth about Home Scams”. Immediately following this is a closely related article, investment frauds and scams, which mentioned the foreclosure and short sale scams which are prevalent in the market. The examples and scams he cited are relevant and timely, including the popular Online scams called phising and vishing. Although the discussion doesn’t go deep enough (much discussion dwells on the obvious), it’s still worthwhile to read the book because the tips and solutions he gave are still helpful.

The Art of the Steal: How to Protect Yourself and Your Business from Fraud–America’s #1 Crime, 2001, Frank W. Abagnale

This is probably the most intriguing and interesting book about frauds and scams that people can find Online. Although it wasn’t really about foreclosure and real-estate scams and totally outdates, I still deem it a necessity for people to read this book because of one simple fact: it was written by one of the most effective scam artists in the world (And probably because I was a fan of Leonardo di Caprio and his great personification of Abagnale’s character in Catch Me If You Can). By reading this book, people can get a glimpse of what scam artists would think of when they are looking for preys, and how they trap this victim with the web of lies they skillfully crafted. Take a closer look at the psychological profile of scam artists; after all, you probably wouldn’t mind reading this since it also provides entertainment value.

Protect Yourself from Real Estate and Mortgage Fraud: Preserving the American Dream of Homeownership, 2007, Roberts, Dollar and Kraynak

If you’re going to read this book, I suggest that you immediately jump on the pages dedicated for equity skimming and foreclosure rescues because I personally find those parts most interesting. Of all the books in this list, this one is probably the most helpful because it is solely dedicated and focused on information about current real-estate frauds and scams. It provides detailed step-by-step tips on how you can detect foreclosure scams and in post-scam cases run after and get back at your scam perpetrators. The story-based approach makes the reading process endurable, whilst also making the moral of the scam stories a lot easier to digest.

The 2012 Consumer Action Handbook

Of course, what is the best way to avoid consumer scams than to read this year’s consumer action handbook? People have to keep themselves updated because scam and fraud artists are always on the business of developing “better, spot-free” fraud techniques. “The best thing about consumer handbook is that they are regularly updated, so people are constantly informed about the complaints, current ploys, and traps set out in the market,” a friend of mine says.

The sad thing is that no monthly updates are available for this book, so consumers must also regularly tune in to news reports about consumer scams.

Bank Security Fraud Securitization In Illegal Mortgage Foreclosure Actions

Bank Security Fraud Securitization In Illegal Mortgage Foreclosure or bank securitization is a scheme by the banks to sell your promissory note and mortgage many, many times and making multiple amounts of money using your debt signature and good credit to swindle you out or your home or property by placing your mortgage and note in a pool of loans within a Trust.

After this mortgage and note securitization happens, your mortgage loan is electronically recorded and this strips the equality out of your note making it a worthless piece of paper. Inside the Trust, your note gets converted from a security under the Uniformed Commercial Code, UCC, Article 3, to a Stock Certificate under UCC Article 8, and selling just a small part of the same Stock Certificate to thousands and thousands of investors many times.

It is similar to you selling the same car title to many people for the same price, but you would be arrested for fraud if you did this as the banks are doing and getting away with robbery and theft of your home and commercial property.

After your promissory note was sold into the trust and was converted into a stock certificate, your note had to be destroyed under the Federal Security Law… No more Note… No more Mortgage, but hello Mortgage Foreclosure fraud!

The Trust is controlled by the Lender’s Pooling and Servicing Agreement, PSA, which spells out that the original Note and Mortgage are accepted by the Trust Custodian, what the Trustee’s job is, and the conversion of the note into a stock certificate. Almost all the time the Lender, Trustee, Investor, or Servicer DO NOT follow their own PSA or legal rules against The Securities Exchange Commission, SEC, rules and laws; therefore, the fraud against WE THE PEOPLE starts and is perpetuated by greedy lawyers representing the greedy banks in an illegal mortgage foreclosure.

This is why homeowners need to complete the Phase One, Notary Administrative procedure to satisfy the “Clean Hands Theory” to show that there is nothing to hide and to exhaust all other remedies before you begin Phase Three. This legal procedure falls under the UCC, Article 3 and all State laws.

The Bank Security Fraud Securitization Audit In any Mortgage Foreclosure is the Second Phase in this Three Phase process to get your Mortgage Lien Released so you can own your home FREE and CLEAR in under 6 months.

Free Tax Foreclosure Listings

Tax foreclosure is a situation in which the home owner is unable to keep up with their government property taxes. In this situation, the government tax agency takes possession of the property and sells the it as soon as possible. The process of foreclosure goes on; the main objective of the agency is to sell the property very soon. They sell the property at a very low price, which is often even less than the market price.

How to Get Started with Tax Foreclosures

There are tons of online foreclosure listing services available. Nevertheless, before you subscribe to a service do several studies, as the superiority of every service can very from one to another. Find out where they gather their information. Also find how frequently they update the foreclosure listings and how regularly old listings are removed. The best foreclosure listing websites are usually voted to be the most major sites. These sites have been around for years, and have developed a solid reputation for quality properties.

Browse Online Foreclosure Listing, Free of Charge!

If you have any problem in paying the monthly fee which is charged by all major sites, then there is no difficulty. The majority of websites offer a 7 day free trial membership, through which you are granted full access to all the listing of the websites. These free trial memberships are the perfect way to get started with tax foreclosures, right now. You can even try out the trial membership from more than one website, which will allow you to find your favorite.