Short Sales – Influencing The Brokers Price Opinion (BPO)

When you do a short sale, the lender most likely will order a BPO.

BPO stands for Brokers Price Opinion and is a process by which a realtor

appointed by the lender, comes out to evaluate the property and give his “opinion”

on what the value of the property is. So the lender sends a realtor out to the

property and it’s your job to influence the BPO to come down as low as you can.

This is the whole key to a successful short sale. This is why you want the lender to

contact you, so you can meet the realtor at the front door and influence their

BPO to come in as low as possible. To build your case, the first thing you

should do is show up with a list of repairs and estimates for the property. If you

have to go get a contractor to bid a job or repair, go get one. The higher the quote,

the better. This is good evidence. The second thing you should do is show up with

a list of comps in the area that are low. Most real estate agents appreciate you

doing some of their work for them. Provide them with the lowest comps you can

find and they will decide if they want to use them or not.

When you meet the realtor on the property steps, just tell him you are the buyer and

doing a short sale on the house. Then you will proceed to walk the realtor

through the property. When you are walking through the property make sure you

point any and every repair or problem with the property. Again, you are trying to

make the value of the home come in as low as possible. If you are dealing with a

nice house with minor cosmetics, you may really have to search for problems.

Then call him the next morning to see if he was able to get the price you wanted. Sometimes they will tell you sometimes they won’t. Just ask to find out. If they won’t tell you, call the bank. Many times they will tell you. You really have no control over this process. You can encourage the BPO to come in low, but this does not always mean they will come in low.

If there is someone living in the property, you may want to ask them to leave when

the realtor comes out to do a BPO. If they can’t, just tell them to stay out

of the way. Explain to them you will be trying to make the house value look as low

as possible. They may not understand why, just tell them it is the only way to save

their house. Also, tell them not to worry about cleaning up at all, leave it the way it

is. This is the one time your house can be a mess. You need to make the value of

the property look as low as possible.

If the loan on the property is FHA or VA, they will not take less than 82% of the BPO.

Usually you can expect the BPO to be in the range of 80-90% of the

repaired value. So if you have a house that is worth $120,000 after repairs, the BPO

you would guess to be about $98,000 to $108,000. Then multiply that amount by

82% and this should give you a good estimate of what to offer. If it is not a VA/FHA

loan, then you can offer whatever you want. It is a good idea to start low, just in

case your BPO comes back lower than you thought, you can always raise the offer. It

is an educated guess to find out what the BPO will be. If it comes back

high not in your favor, sometimes you can call the loss mitigation department and

tell them the BPO is way to high. Many times they will work with you and

order another BPO. Whatever you do, don’t ever give up. If they don’t accept it,

negotiate with them some more. Ask them what they are looking for, or what they

are trying to get. Sometimes they will tell you, sometimes they won’t. Be

persistence. Be patient. Ask, ask, ask. Part of being successful in this business is

how you negotiate. You don’t ever want to be rude to them, but let them know

where you stand. Make them aware of what’s happening to the property.

How to Price Foreclosure Cleanup Jobs For Profit Using HUD’s Guidelines

A foreclosure cleanup business does everything from lawn maintenance, to trashouts, to cleaning, pressure washing, gutter cleaning, repairs and more.

The foreclosure trashout industry is proving to be a lucrative business option for hardworking entrepreneurs. With one in every 25 homes in foreclosure, per Michael Williams, Fannie Mae CEO, and with millions of adjustable-rate mortgages poised to reset in the coming years (creating the prospect of a new round of foreclosures), foreclosure cleaning startups are perfectly situated to have evergreen enterprises for years to come.

Though foreclosure cleaning is a burgeoning industry, due to the sheer number of jobs available, foreclosure cleanup can be a business with thin profit margins if entrepreneurs aren’t pricing their services for profit.

Pricing for profit can be tricky for new property preservation business owner who don’t know the ins and outs of how contracts are won, who gets paid first, where they are on the totem pole in getting paid, etc.

A good tool to use in pricing foreclosure and trashout type jobs is HUD’s pricing guidelines for property preservation type companies — BUT, to use this tool alone can be a grave mistake.

When using HUD’s guidelines to price jobs, business owners should be aware that the tables list the maximum amount HUD will generally pay the PRIMARY contractor of a foreclosure cleaning job.

As a smaller company, business owners should know where they are on the totem pole in actually getting paid to know how to charge using the tables. They should also learn how to figure out whether they are the primary subcontractor, number two in line, number three, etc. This will not only help them figure out how to price, but will also guide them in figuring out the best strategy to use in winning jobs.

Foreclosure cleanup business owners cannot simply look at the HUD pricing charts and use those figures for bidding, or they’ll certainly overbid a job and lose out. The tables have to be dissected effectively

Remember, the HUD pricing guidelines for foreclosure cleaning are what HUD will pay, maximum, for a service (though certain scenarios will permit them to go higher with substantiating information). The amounts listed in the charts are really for that primary contractor.

Anybody can price, but pricing “for profit” in the burgeoning foreclosure cleaning industry is an art. New foreclosure cleanup businesses should plan to do their research so they can learn how to dissect the HUD charts and price effectively for profit to win more cleanup business.